How to ask intelligent questions in an interviewDo you get tongue tied in interviews when asked ‘do you have any questions?’ Are you worried about asking the ‘wrong’ question? In an interview, you want to make sure you ask questions when given the opportunity – but they need to be well thought out. You want to show that you’d work well in the role and you’re compatible with the company culture.

If you’re afraid of looking foolish by asking the wrong question, read our tips and take the time to prepare prior to your interview. Asking informed, well thought out questions will demonstrate to the interviewer that you are interested in the role and the company – while helping you to gather some information that’s going to be useful in making a decision about whether or not you really want to work there. Asking questions in an interview won’t make you appear rude or arrogant – quite the opposite in fact – it’s the perfect way to show off several of the most important traits that recruiters are looking for. Here are some areas to focus on:

  • The Company: even just a quick Internet search will provide you with enough information about the company to formulate some intelligent questions. This shows interest and preparation and will help you to better understand some of the challenges the company might currently be facing. Questions could be quite general, or focus on a specific area of concern or something currently/recently in the news. Examples: What affect has ‘the recent issue’ had on the company? How does this company differentiate itself from its competitors? What changes do you anticipate in the industry and how will these impact the role?
  • The Role: You want to gain a good insight into the position, the expectations and what you’d be doing on a day to day basis, but you should also try to gain an understanding of where the role is headed and its scope for expansion down the track. Examples: What are the essential capabilities/qualifications/experience to achieve success in this role? What is the company’s vision for this role? What were the strengths/weaknesses of the previous incumbent? Why is this position vacant – has the previous person left/been promoted? Will I have an opportunity to meet those who would be part of my staff/my manager/my team during the interview process? What do you see as the most important performance criteria for this role in the next six months/12 months/2 years?
  • Success Factors: You want to understand how the company measures success and what impact this role has on the company’s overall success. This demonstrates that you are able to think strategically and understand that every role has an impact on the company’s bigger picture. Examples: How do you evaluate success here? How would you describe the company’s culture?
  • The End Result: You will be keen to understand the timeline for the company’s decision making process and you shouldn’t leave without gaining this. Walking out of an interview without this understanding can be very frustrating. Waiting isn’t fun, and not knowing when to follow up a recruiter is hard. You could also offer the best way to contact you and confirm your enthusiasm to progress to the next stage. Examples: What is the company’s timeline for making a decision? What are the next steps that need to be taken before you make your decision about who to offer the role to? When can I expect to hear back from you? Is there anyone else I need to meet with? Is there anyone else that you would recommend I talk to? Is there any other information I can provide?

Many of our clients think of interviews as a chance for recruiters to grill them relentlessly to test their suitability for a role. However the best interviews are two-way streets. Be prepared and ask some of your own well thought-out targeted questions and listen to the interviewer’s responses so you can clarify areas that don’t make sense. By doing this, you will demonstrate just how much of an asset you could be in the role. Make sure not to ask about something that has already been addressed, since this may hinder rather than help your chances.

Do you struggle with formulating intelligent questions to ask in an interview? Would you like assistance deciding what areas to focus on? If so see, please see our Interview Coaching and Interview Training Services.

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